Any help would really be great

TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
Hi all,

I just tried to restring my cort g-250 for the 1st time, and I'm sure someone can count the number of mistakes I've probably made!

I took all the strings off first, I'm sure you're supposed to replace them one at a time. I've been fine tuning them for an hour or so and the pitch is fine, but... (always a but)

-the tremelo's at a funny angle in relation to the body of the guitar, if you know what i mean. This means that all of the strings are tilted, and I'm getting nasty fret buzz on the 1st string.
-this last bit might just me being tone deaf, but i swear when i play a g major chord (as an example), the 6th string is "out" a bit.

I know its a bit long all this, but any help would really be great

Cheers, tom

Comments

  • Options
    Yeah, thats not a biggy. I'm not sure of the trem you have on your guitar... can you pull up, as well as push down on the bar?

    Either way, whats happened is that the tension of the strings is greater than tension of the springs in the back of the guitar. If you unscrew the plate behind the guitar, you'll find a claw screwed into the wood, with some springs atatched to it.

    What to do is:
    De-tune the strings of the guitar, till they're all a little flat, then screw teh claw into the wood just a little more.
    Then retune.

    Is it better?
    If not, do it again & again till it is alright. Make sure that, when you replace strings in future, that you stick to the same gague & brand of strings or else you'll have to do this every time.

    Bu retuning one string at a time, you ensure that the tension is always being kept the same & it saves the effort of the above. Hope this helps \:\)
  • Options
    the old thing I would worry about is if you have a floyd Rose trem, buy letting the trem go loose and then tight again the Truss rod may have moved or settled in the wrong way \:\(

    but it may not have. it might be a good idea to have a quick check up with a tech

    peace
  • Options
    Yeah
    what Onen said ;\)

    this happened to me not long after i had bought my guitar,i didn't have a clue
    and i was sitting there tuning up
    after restringing with 11's
    when, oh look there goes my bridge
    it's climbing higher and higher...
    arrgh!!! help!!
    so i went back to the shop
    they fixed it for me and explained why it did that and only took the "P" a little bit \:\)

    hehe
  • TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
    Cheers guys,

    Interesting stuff! I thought I had it sorted out yesterday, it seemed the trem had somehow caught on one of the pegs holding it up, and it fell back into place with a satisfying snap after a bit of fiddling. \:D \:D

    BUT... All of the notes were still a little flat (I had been stretching these strings all damned day so that wasnt the problem!), and I've just picked up my guitar now and managed to snap a brand new 1st string after 5 minutes of light playing!

    As a matter of fact i'd already had a look under that panel on the bottom of the guitar to figure out how to get strings out (duh) so i'll be having another look now! I'll get back to you when I've tried again! Cheers \:\) \:\)

    tom
  • Options
    if your snapping strings that quickly you could try a thicker set??
    but of course that would mean setting up our guitar slightly differently(truss rod, innotation , etc..)
    either that or youve gotta learn to be a bit more gentle
  • TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
     Quote:
    Originally posted by dougakapw:
    if your snapping strings that quickly you could try a thicker set??
    but of course that would mean setting up our guitar slightly differently(truss rod, innotation , etc..)
    either that or youve gotta learn to be a bit more gentle



    Yep I had thought about that, on my old acoustic I fitted a slightly "thicker" (?) bottom E string which seemed to help a little. But I wouldnt want to up the whole set, I'm really getting into my string bends! I guess I will have to force myself to be less violent! Maybe turn the amp up a bit... really get on the neighbours' good side!
    \:D \:D \:D

    [ 05 January 2002: Message edited by: Tom ]
  • Options
    yup thats the way just give that guitar whole lotta love and it'll take you on the stairway to heaven

    haha there we go 3 led zeppelin song names in one sentance, damn im good
  • TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
    oooooook, the guitar's in pretty good tune, but the action is WAY too low (i.e. i'm getting fret buzz on all of the strings) and the tremelo is still diagonally aligned to the body of the guitar. Could this be because as I have screwed the claw in more, the action has lowered and lowered, until i've managed to get in tune but now have fret buzz?!?! ah well, at least i still have my trusty old simple fixed bridge acoustic to play on until this is fixed! \:D \:D Thanks so much, this is a real big learning curve for me!
  • Options
    Hi Tom. Nice chatting to you a few minutes ago. I'm trying to picture what you mean by trem being at the wrong angle to the guitar... let's see:
    The metal plate into which your tremelo arm is inserted; the edge of that plate furthest away from your headstock: is it raised out of the guitar, and is that what you mean by it being at the wrong angle?
    If so: How many springs are attached to the claw in the back of your guitar?
    You're probably right that you've screwed the claw in too much, hence the fret buzz. Unscrew it but by bit, testing for fret buzz - bear in mind that it's better to have a little bit of fret buzz than a ridiculously high action - until you're satisfied. Now, if there are 2 springs or fewer on the claw, try getting some matching springs (I don't know where from, ask Regent or your local hardware store!), and adding them. They will increase the tension created by the trem arm, which will pull the plate-edge back into the guitar. Then you can properly stretch the strings on your guitar. Then, if you like, you can remove the additional springs (though you might need to stretch the strings a bit more).
    If I haven't understood the problem and this has been of no use, I apologise! Hope you get sorted, one way or another. \:\)
  • Options
    Oh yea, I remember when I first started palying, all the questions I had about Guitars, Amps and such. Now after ten plus years of playing I still have a lot of questions.

    Here's some things I've learned that may help you (I hope):

    Guitars and amps are a lot like cars. Some are better looking than others, some cost more than others, some are better built than others, and everyone has an opinion on what is best.

    So with guitars, try to find out who actually makes the guitar your thingking about. For example an Epiphone Les Paul costs more than a Samick Les Paul, but they are both built by Samick.

    With amps, look at both new and used. Tube ?
    Solid State ? Modeling ?

    Buy what you like, not what some saleperson
    is pushing today.

    And Rule #1:

    Do not buy it until you try it. (For mail/internet ordering make sure you have time to return something without charge if it is not what you want.


    Rule #2: Music should be fun.
  • TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
     Quote:
    Originally posted by Lincoln:
    The metal plate into which your tremelo arm is inserted; the edge of that plate furthest away from your headstock: is it raised out of the guitar, and is that what you mean by it being at the wrong angle?


    Not quite, if you were to look at the guitar from the end to the headstock, the trem would not look straight horizontally. It is also very close to the body itself, which can't be right because the trem has to be flexed to work right?! Adjusting the claw on the bottom of the guitar seems to make little, if any difference to the alignment of the trem.

    I'm guessing that I'd need a decent allen key to realign the trem right? I think?

    Thanks again
  • Options
    Great, so I rambled on without being any help whatsoever! OK, so now as I understand, the back edge of your tremelo plate isn't lying parallel with the body of the guitar? If that's the case, then I shouldn't worry about. My squier strat's tremelo plate doesn't lie parallel either. Leave it alone and don't worry about it. As for the fret buzz: get an allen key small enough to fit into the appropriate holes on the individual string saddles, and raise them individually as necessary.
  • TommyTommy Posts: 147Member
    That's fantastic, apart from getting the set of allen keys its all sorted! The guitar's playable, just a little bit of fret buzz on the 1st fret

    Cheers guys... \:D \:D \:D
  • Options
    Tom,

    Decide what gauge & make of strings you want to use & get a professional set-up. Even if you do your own after that, at least you'll know what a good set-up should feel like.
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