I need help

FallenFallen Posts: 19Member
edited September 2016 in Technical or Theoretical Questions
Not been playing long, self teaching.

I need a practice routine that will give me skills good enough to play lead in a band.

I need help on how to practice these and how long. etc

scales, how to improve speed with metronome etc
chords, changing etc
tapping
sweep picking

thankyou

Comments

  • crin766crin766 Posts: 46Member
    Have you done justin's course's on justin guitar.com? He has a great beginner course and then there's loads of intermediate lessons of varying difficulty all free with a donation option, which I hope people will use.

    As for how much on which skills you should work on I can't really advise on that. Im still learning but I personally spend 60% of my time working on new songs 20% on practicing songs I know and 20% on scales. Learning clapton and other greats is the best practise you can do IMHO
  • The23rdmanThe23rdman Posts: 1,560Member
    Originally Posted By: crin766
    Have you done justin's course's on justin guitar.com? He has a great beginner course and then there's loads of intermediate lessons of varying difficulty all free with a donation option, which I hope people will use.

    As for how much on which skills you should work on I can't really advise on that. Im still learning but I personally spend 60% of my time working on new songs 20% on practicing songs I know and 20% on scales. Learning clapton and other greats is the best practise you can do IMHO


    I second this. smile
  • dharma66dharma66 Posts: 829Member

    I concur with what went before.

     

    Many years ago I played a lot, and got to the point where our band could safely cover Van Halen, Metallica, Steve Vai or pretty much anything, because they knew I would be able to nail the guitar part in a few days, or a week or two at most For something by Yngwie image

     

    To get to that point, I plated between 8 and 12 hours a day, every day, for five years. Sometimes playing 12 or 14 hours. I reckon I put in something like 15,000 hours in those five years.

     

    So in terms of for how long...it depends on your available time, commitment and where you want to get to.

     

    in my usual 8-10 hour day, I would spend no more than 2-4 hours doing drills, so about 25% of the time. The rest was learning songs or just sitting and noodling for fun.

  • JockoJocko Posts: 7,106Member, Moderator

    My problem is I get bored after about 10 minutes doing any one thing.  Doesn't matter if it is a song I am dying to learn, I still get fed up, and end up doing something else.  Probably explains why, after nearly 50 years playing guitar, I am still a rubbish novice!

  • dharma66dharma66 Posts: 829Member
    Originally Posted by Jocko:
    My problem is I get bored after about 10 minutes doing any one thing.  Doesn't matter if it is a song I am dying to learn, I still get fed up, and end up doing something else.  Probably explains why, after nearly 50 years playing guitar, I am still a rubbish novice!


    I bet that's not entirely true

    But I have to say, after 25 years off, I genuinely am a rubbish novice! So whilst I can describe what I did as a teenager to get to be quite good, I can't substantiate it now

     

    Focus is an issue, though, for a lot of people, and my advice there (for what it's worth), is to have a handful of things that you are working on.

     

    Jocko, I don't want you to think I'm lecturing you here! This is intended as advice to newcomers. Don't want to teach you to suck eggs!

     

    I used to have something like:

    1. A set of chromatic technique exercises
    2. A set of scales
    3. A couple of chord progressions
    4. Half a dozen songs
    5. Noodling time


    I was pretty fortunate that my OCD nature would allow me to do chromatic finger exercises for a couple of hours a day without getting bored, so I used to spend at least an hour a day on each of the above, but you can also just do 10 minutes of exercises from 1, then 10 minutes of a song from 4, then 10 minutes of scales from 2, a different song from 4, a bit of 5, and so on.

    When you get bored with what you are doing, move to some thing else, but have a stack of those something else's immediately to hand. Literally. Have a folder with the stuff in you are working on, and when you sit down to play, pull stuff out of the folder. Keep in the folder only those things you are working on at the moment. So just a few scales, a few challenging chords and progressions, and just the few songs you are working on right now.

    When you get truly fed up with something, take it out of the folder, and replace it with something else.

    This allows you to have a practice session that is varied and yet focused at the same time, and everything you are working on is something that will move you forward.

    I was about to say 'even point 5', but I'm going to change that to say 'especially point 5'. The noodling is where it all comes together subconsciously. For me it started out as just mucking about in the blues scale in just one shape. But eventually, as you do it more, the noodling is where the creativity occurs, and it's where you can experiment putting those scales, chords and ideas into some loose, fun context. And of course fun is the key.

  • JockoJocko Posts: 7,106Member, Moderator

    There is a lot to be said for your approach.  I used to do the "10 Minute Guitar Workout" everyday but that has fallen by the wayside.  I like to work through my set list, which takes 35 minutes and then I work on what I am doing for my next lesson (oh, shoot. That's tonight).  I just get fed up playing guitar after about 90 minutes!

  • dharma66dharma66 Posts: 829Member
    Originally Posted by Jocko:

     I just get fed up playing guitar after about 90 minutes!

    To be honest, the biggest disappointment for me since my 'come back' is that I feel exactly the same.

     

    Where I used to be completely obsessed, and literally would have my guitar around my neck all day, even when brewing up or making beans on toast, I now find that after an hour, maybe two, I find I want to put it down.

     

    Took me completely by surprise when I got my new guitar. I think the best thing to do when this happens is to put it down. I don't want to end up resenting it, or it becoming a drag.

     

    I had kind of hoped that I'd find myself falling asleep playing, though, like I used too image

  • MyronEMyronE Posts: 26Member

    An important point if you want to be a lead player (I'm not but I know plenty...) is to devote a fair proportion of your practice time to just letting rip with anything that takes your fancy (play along with your favourite tracks/TV programmes if other musicians aren't available). Learn to trust your ears and don't get distracted worrying whether you're playing the "right" scale, mode or whatever. For sure, allocate time for technique and theory studies  - then put them out of your mind when playing your own stuff. The skills and knowledge you acquire in your more formal practice sessions will feed through unconciously.

  • Mark PMark P Posts: 2,314Member
    Originally Posted by MyronE:

    An important point if you want to be a lead player (I'm not but I know plenty...) is to devote a fair proportion of your practice time to just letting rip with anything that takes your fancy (play along with your favourite tracks/TV programmes if other musicians aren't available). Learn to trust your ears and don't get distracted worrying whether you're playing the "right" scale, mode or whatever. For sure, allocate time for technique and theory studies  - then put them out of your mind when playing your own stuff. The skills and knowledge you acquire in your more formal practice sessions will feed through unconciously.

    So true.

     

    Though to trust my ears I had to find a key to unlock the mystery of how to get them to hear what I was playing properly. To hear as a player / creator rather than as a listener. A beautiful discovery!

  • dharma66dharma66 Posts: 829Member

    +1

     

    The old Cadburys Flake adverts were awesome to join in with image

  • rustikphilrustikphil Posts: 14Member

    There are many jam/backing track sites on line. When you are confident with a few scales and licks find a track or two of the genre you belong in and try them out. I would tend to avoid actual backing tracks of songs and source an appropriate jam track as they give to time and space. You may have to sus' the key but, if you have a "good ear" that shouldn't be a problem.... good luck. try; guitarbackingtracks.com (I think thats it, or it something similar)

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